Location Information
(for the Robinson-Maloney House)
Name:Robinson-Maloney House [Dantzler House]
Address:1042 Beach Boulevard
1028 Beach Boulevard, West
City/County:Biloxi, Harrison County
Architectural Information
Construction Date:c.1850
Architectural Styles(s):Greek Revival, Neoclassical
No. of Stories:2
Remodeling Date:c.1908
Destroyed:Aug. 29, 2005 (Hurricane Katrina)
Mississippi Landmark Information
Designated:10-24-1985
Recorded:12-10-1985
Book/Vol. No.:V. 165, p. 400
Local Designation Information
Local District Name:West Central Historic District
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Local Landmark Listing Date:07 Sep 2010
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Context/Comments
Originally listed as element #15, 'pivotal contributing', in West Central National Register Historic District. Delisted from NRHP on June 4, 2015.
Brief Description
Large, two-story, wood-frame residence with a truncated hip roof marked on the facade by a low pitched
gable/pediment. Two-tiered gallery with bow-front center bay supported by attenuated Ionic columns extends across the entire facade and encircles the east and west elevations. Outstanding leaded-glass windows and interior woodwork. Originally, single-story Greek Revival with elaborate formal gardens and outbuildings.
Historic Information
Built in 1849 by John Ghamm Robinson, an English planter. Robinson owned the house until 1873, when it was sold to Frederick Gaupp. It was bought by the Maloney family in 1884, and remained in their hands until 1912. It was under their ownership that the house was extensively remodeled in the Colonial Revival idiom between 1906-1909. The house was sold to S.L. Dodds in 1912. Mr. Dodds transferred ownership to the Dantzler family in 1918. The Catholic Doicese purchased the house from the Dantzler family in 1921. The Diocese first used the house as the Notre Dame High School for boys, and later for the Sisters of the Little Flower Convent of Mercy. The Dantzler House was heavily damaged by Hurricane Camille in 1969, and was acquired by The City and subsequently moved south.